Static Gallery 26/9/15

Meine Nacht. It doesn’t take a bilingual raver to work this one out: it stands for My Night –which is suitably reflective of the concept around which these events are built: every person who attends is encouraged to make of it what they will – it’s all about the personal experience someone has when it comes to nightlife.

The club scene in Liverpool is thriving, and it’s not just the big dogs that are wowing crowds. Events like Meine Nacht are catering to our natural need for intimacy – something that is frequently lost when the crowd numbers are high and the pyrotechnics are bright. The party was launched by two Liverpool-based DJs (a familiar enough story), but the territory they’re crossing into is unique. They pushed excitement through the choice of a secret venue prior to their last event, with the postcode kept shush until the last minute. But they tease the location through social media this time, dropping hints and posting pictures of the interior and exterior.

Although in many ways they have gone back to basics and have stripped back the idea of clubbing, they’re pushing forward with relevant and new technology. The whole night is streamed through Chew TV; something which has been executed by major festivals through services like BE-AT TV, and also small and exclusive parties for Boiler Room, allowing audiences to be involved even when they’re not able to attend.

On arrival at what is eventually revealed as Static Gallery on Roscoe Street, we are greeted with friendly faces and a surprisingly chilled atmosphere. Meine Nacht is characterised as a project that combines media, music and artistic visual representation, and the layout reflects it. The projection screen behind the DJ dances with pastel colours, contrasting against the bare walls and metal beams on the ceiling in the small main room, which only holds approximately 60 people.



Orlagh Dooley, the co-founder of Meine Nacht along with Jessica Beaumont, explains: “We don’t focus on how many people come through the door; it’s more like a collaboration with the audience, and this takes us back to the house party feel which is rife within student lives.”

There is an element of trespassing, the space seems hidden away from the centre of the city, it is far from the hustle and bustle but close enough to still feel like it is part of the urban buzz. It is something that the women purposefully aim for. “Another big influence came from our personal experiences exploring Berlin,” Orlagh tells us. “The hidden scene around the area of Kreuzberg is something we took into consideration when starting the night.”

It’s not only the venues which are intricately thought-out; the choice of headliner is undoubtedly a smart one. SAMUEL DEEP is one of the most diverse and forward-thinking young artists currently leading the scene. He brings rolling bass, teasing synths and a set filled with substance and style. It is quality house music with no frills, leaving the crowd bopping along as they mingle with friends.

“We really look at the way DJs connect with an audience,” Orlagh says as she talks us through her reasoning behind the booking. “There’s no real musical trend when choosing headliners; obviously we pick artists that we feel are making waves in the underground scene, but we don’t want to be confine in our choices.”

The future looks bright for Meine Nacht, with a loyal following of ravers that appreciate and utilise the parties that they curate, and the line-ups are set to cement their reputation even further. “We have artists coming up who are signed to the likes of Jackmaster’s Numbers label and also Smallville Records,” says Orlagh, “and we do have plans to link up with other brands for our parties.” Every detail makes the difference with Meine Nacht and, moving forward, the club night definitely has the power to bring a little bit of Berlin to Liverpool with each event.

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